Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

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Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by Thinkforyourself on Fri Jan 22, 2016 7:43 pm

Posted by Admin on 05/05/2015
In many old flat Earth books the fact that Polaris can be seen as far South as 23.5 degrees (Tropic of Capricorn) is spoken of as a generally-accepted fact:



“If the Earth is a sphere and the pole star hangs over the northern axis, it would be impossible to see it for a single degree beyond the equator, or 90 degrees from the pole. The line-of-sight would become a tangent to the sphere, and consequently several thousand miles out of and divergent from the direction of the pole star. Many cases, however, are on record of the north polar star being visible far beyond the equator, as far even as the tropic of Capricorn.” -Dr. Samuel Rowbotham, “Earth Not a Globe, 2nd Edition” (41)

“The astronomers' theory of a globular Earth necessitates the conclusion that, if we travel south of the equator, to see the North Star is an impossibility. Yet it is well known this star has been seen by navigators when they have been more than 20 degrees south of the equator. This fact, like hundreds of other facts, puts the theory to shame, and gives us a proof that the Earth is not a globe.” -William Carpenter, “100 Proofs the Earth is Not a Globe” (71)

I found that to account for this glaring problem in their model, desperate heliocentrists since the late 19th century have claimed the ball-Earth actually tilts a convenient 23.5 degrees back on its vertical axis. Even this brilliant revision to their theory cannot account for the visibility of many other constellations though. For instance, Ursa Major, very close to Polaris, can be seen from 90 degrees North latitude (the North Pole) all the way down to 30 degrees South latitude. The constellation Vulpecula can be seen from 90 degrees North latitude, all the way to 55 degrees South latitude. Taurus, Pisces and Leo can be seen from 90 degrees North all the way to 65 degrees South. Aquarius and Libra can be seen from 65 degrees North to 90 degrees South! The constellation Virgo is visible from 80 degrees North down to 80 degrees South, and Orion can be seen from 85 degrees North all the way to 75 degrees South latitude! An observer on a ball-Earth, regardless of any tilt or inclination, should not logically be able to see this far.

Anyway, I was hoping members from the Southern latitudes might take/post some pictures confirming how far south Polaris and these other constellations appear. It is difficult to find any information online regarding this so it would be good if we could compile such research here.

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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by Thinkforyourself on Fri Jan 22, 2016 7:43 pm

Posted by admiralbyrd on 07/27/2015
Yes! I love the Polaris argument. 

The 23.5 tilt doesn't do anything, really, when you keep in mind that "the axis of the earth's rotation" (in the bullshit globe earth model) still points to Polaris, even if the earth itself is at 23.5 degrees. The circumpolar photos (like the one you showed above Eric) shows that Polaris is always the still midpoint of the rotation. I've done some research and have seen that the circumpolar photos are all perfect circles even at different latitudes on Earth, which could not be possible except right at the north pole (if the earth was round).

Here's one from Portugal - epod.usra.edu/blog/2011/08/north-circumpolar-stars-observed-from-portugal.html <- a beautiful, perfectly round circumpolar shot. 
home.comcast.net/~edwelda/site/?/page/Sky_Gallery/ (one from near Boston) <--- also beautiful and round. 

The strong Polaris argument proves that the Earth is a) NOT round and b) NOT rotating on its own axis. 

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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by iahawks on Sun Jan 24, 2016 12:30 am

If were are spinning around an axis (and going in an elliptical orbit around the sun at the same time), then photos like this star trail time-lapse photo below would be absolutely impossible. How does it make any sense that -- if we are spinning on an axis -- that the North Star never moves… ever, and the other stars move in almost perfect circles around IT? It's only possible if we are motionless, the North Star is motionless, and the circular motion of the other stars around Polaris is simply the "nature" of what they do. This whole Polaris proof ALONE should be Case Closed.

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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by BlueAmber22 on Mon Aug 15, 2016 6:59 pm

All matches perfectly fine under the JEWsuits perspective


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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by thesilentone on Tue Aug 16, 2016 1:06 am

BlueAmber22 wrote:All matches perfectly fine under the JEWsuits perspective


What do you mean? On that BS tilted ball with curved water, you still can not see a star directly over the north point from anywhere south of the 'equator'.

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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by coppersterling on Wed Apr 19, 2017 4:18 pm

:-) I think blueamber was referring to the number of the angle, thesilentone

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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by Vespillo on Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:50 am

It still boggles my mind that you can't see Polaris from beyond the Tropic of Capricorn, can anyone explain this in a laymen terms ? I've been trying to figure it out but cannot.
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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

Post by Admin on Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:08 am

If you're standing at the North Pole, Polaris will be 90 degrees directly overhead. As you start traveling southwards, the law of perspective will cause Polaris to gradually decline in the sky. The further south you travel, the lower Polaris appears in the sky, until you reach approximately 20 degrees south latitude by which point Polaris descends beyond the horizon so people from that vantage point can no longer see it.

Some heliocentrists have even tried to suggest that the Pole Star’s gradual declination overhead as an observer travels southwards is proof of a globular Earth. Far from it, the declination of the Pole Star or any other object is simply a result of the Law of Perspective. The Law of Perspective dictates that the angle and height at which an object is seen diminishes the farther one recedes from the object, until at a certain point the line of sight and the seemingly uprising surface of the Earth converges to a vanishing point (i.e. the horizon line) beyond which the object is invisible.



“If we select a flat street a mile long, containing a row of lamps, it will be noticed that from where we stand the lamps gradually decline to the ground, the last one being apparently quite on the ground. Take the lamp at the end of the street and walk away from it a hundred yards, and it will appear to be much nearer the ground than when we were close to it; keep on walking away from it and it will appear to be gradually depressed until it is last seen on the ground and then disappears. Now, according to the astronomers, the whole mile was only depressed about eight inches from one end to the other, so that this 8 in. could not account for the enormous depression of the light as we recede from it. This proves that the depression of the Pole Star can and does take place in relation to a flat surface, simply because we increase our distance from it, the same as from the street lamp. In other words, the further away we get from any object above us, as a star for example, the more it is depressed, and if we go far enough it will sink (or appear to sink) to the horizon and then disappear. The writer has tried the street lamp many times with the same result.” -Thomas Winship, “Zetetic Cosmogeny” (34)
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Re: Polaris Seen From The Southern Hemi'sphere'

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